Sales Taxes State by State

| December 20, 2012

Sales tax varies by state, with five states not charging a sales tax at all. Learn more about the different 2012 tax rates on sales of certain items to see where your state falls in the range. Once you know your state sales tax, DexKnows listings can help you find plenty of local shopping opportunities.

States Withsales tax state by state out a Sales Tax

Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon do not have sales tax at the state level. Other taxes do exist in these states to help make up for the lack of an overall sales tax. For example, Alaska allows local jurisdictions to collect sales taxes, and car rental and cruise ship taxes apply to visitors.

States With a Sales Tax

The remaining states do collect an overall sales tax, with certain exemptions. Find the 2012 tax rates in this state-by-state breakdown:

Alabama — 4 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

Arizona — 6.6 percent, with exemptions for prescription medications and food

Arkansas — 6 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications and a lower tax rate, 2 percent, for food

California — 7.25 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Colorado — 2.9 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Connecticut — 6.35 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

District of Columbia — 6 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

Florida — 6 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

Georgia — 4 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Hawaii — 4 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

Idaho — 6 percent sales tax, with an exemption for prescription medications

Illinois — 6.25 percent, with a local tax of 1 percent on food as well as on prescription and over-the-counter medications

Indiana — 7 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Iowa — 6 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Kansas — 6.3 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

Kentucky — 6 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Louisiana — 4 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Maine — 5 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Maryland — 6 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

Massachusetts — 6.25 percent, with exemptions for food, essential items and prescription medications

Michigan — 6 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Minnesota — 6.875 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

Mississippi — 7 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

Missouri — 4.225 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications and a lower tax rate, 1.225 percent, for food

Nebraska — 5.5 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Nevada — 6.85 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

New Jersey — 7 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

New Mexico — 5.125 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

New York — 4.0 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

North Carolina — 4.75 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

North Dakota — 5 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Ohio — 5.5 percent, with some localized exemptions for food and prescription medications

Oklahoma — 4.5 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

Pennsylvania — 6 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

Rhode Island — 7 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

South Carolina — 6 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

South Dakota — 4 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

Tennessee — 7 percent, with and exemption for prescription medications and a lower tax rate, 5.5 percent, for food

Texas — 6.25 percent, with exemptions for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

Utah — 5.95 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications and a lower tax rate, 1.75 percent, for food

Vermont — 6 percent, with an exemption for food as well as for prescription and over-the-counter medications

Virginia — 5 percent, with an exemption for prescription and over-the-counter medications as well as a lower tax rate, 2.5 percent, for food

Washington — 6.5 percent, with an exemption for food and prescription medications

West Virginia — 6 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications and a lower tax rate, 3 percent, for food

Wisconsin — 5 percent, with exemptions for food and prescription medications

Wyoming — 4 percent, with an exemption for prescription medications

In addition to certain exemptions, some states have income credits for low-income families with regard to paid sales tax.

If you need help learning more about such credits or with your 2012 IRS forms in general, DexKnows listings can help you find a certified public account or help you find online tax tools such as Tax Calculator or TaxSlayer. Also, for planning purposes, you can get advice regarding 2013 tax rates.

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Category: Accountants & Tax Preparers, Taxes

About the Author ()

Pamela Mitchell spent more than 15 years at daily newspapers such as the Hartford Courant and Houston Chronicle before becoming a full-time freelancer. She now writes about a variety of topics, from dining and entertainment to pets and travel.